A Prisoner's Quintessence: a five-leaved pattern for friends & activists.

5.    Marijuana Policy Project, NORML, Drug Reform Coordination Network, and others leverage your contributions into public awareness, & political action.  Learn more about their programmes; then help prisoners & future defendants with your generous gifts. 

4.   Write Congress, and ask that they support States Medical Marijuana Rights Act.

3.   Lobby Your Representative In Congress to reinstate Federal Parole.  Current policy, for example, mandates that Bryan Epis serve eight-and-a-half years of a ten-year sentence
(seven-and-a-half, if Bryan were to renounce his patient-status, and confess to Being an Addict).
A retro-active return to parole would allow his release after three-and-a-half years.

2.   Petition President Bush to pardon the prisoners you've grown to know.  Share your perspective, and share truthfully, from your love of justice & country.

1.   Write to prisoners.  Tell them, even, of simple things in your life.  So much of prison's punishment lies in dis-fellowship, isolation, literal exile out of state...
... so much, that an account of rainy days or fair encourages them... your encouragements thrill them.

0.  Compassion Flowering Exponentially:
  • For all you do -- whether you write, donate, or phone or visit -- ask ten friends to do likewise, encouraging them to find friends of their own, and on and away;
  • Leverage your experience, marking your ups, your wins, your joys.  Cultivate these leaves, and make them yours.  Find a way to help ten others, or more, learn what you know, helping them make it theirs...
    ... any thing is possible, I've heard, when you're sowing the seeds of love.


  • We thank Bryan Epis, who wrote to us with five thoughtfully composed "things you can do to help get me out of the slammer".  As you begin helping, whether in a rush or tentatively, remember that a timely opportunity of compassionate choice, set before an uncertain mind, can open gates.  Love Life, love Love.



































    If thirty-six months seems brief to you, consider:  on average, convicted rapists serve four years imprisonment.  Invite Congress to rescind this particularly politically biased cruelty.